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01.0×033


Discussion (17)¬

  1. Hallway says:

    I…see?

  2. Boosta82 says:

    NOT what I expected to glimpse. Didn’t expect to see anything, truth be told. Mystery and drama is better that way…

  3. Russell says:

    Like Boosta; not expecting anything, but if I did expect anything, that would not be it.

  4. kitty says:

    nutcrackery

  5. Ripply says:

    …Jimmy Carter.

    As in–a statue of PresidentJimmy Carter.

    What.

  6. Jason Thorn says:

    Lemme finish that for you, Ripply.

    The.

    HECK?

  7. thisfox says:

    Possibly this is a reference only the Americans will get?

    …So this is what happens when you don’t read enough foreign history, folks. You don’t get a clue when you read webcomics…

    • Caled says:

      This is not a reference only Americans will get; this is a reference only historically literate people will understand.

  8. Morgan says:

    …and what is the refrence?

    • Sarah TX says:

      Jimmy Carter was the 39th US president, Nobel Peace Prize winner… and former peanut farmer.

      Carter was a really smart and nice guy, but not a very effective president.

      • Sarah TX says:

        At least, in our universe.

        • vodhozk says:

          I don’t know about that. Whenever somebody can stop a war by locking the opposing heads of state in their summer home until they work a deal out and succeed, they must have had something going for them.

    • Schnuh330 says:

      the main reference is tying TAZ’s Reclamation movement with Jimmy Carter’s humanitarian work especially his work with Habitat For Humanity. He was a good president just not a great one. His time after his term as PUSA, is much more memorable, he champions many causes, and does a lot of good for a lot of people all over the world. His last 2 years in office as president were marked by disaster, and crisis, the Iran hostage crisis, the 1979 energy crisis, the Three Mile Island nuclear accident, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan (at the end of 1979), and the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. I know I’m late to comment but I decided to go back and read it all over from the beginning.

  9. Typo says:

    The whole “American presidents as greco-roman heroes” is somewhat based on historical fact. In America’s early days when it was trying to get its identity it didn’t have a lot to choose from. It wanted to separate itself from Europe but it couldn’t very well draw culture from the land’s native population (ew!) so there was a brief period of time when America was all about ancient Greece. The ideal of democracy and the artistic and cultural legitimacy just waiting to be appropriated was too good to pass up.

    There are some true-no-foolin’ statues of American founders every bit as ridiculous as the ones in Templar. They got out of that phase long before Carter took office of course, but Templar’s alt-history so…

    • Halykan says:

      Well, it was more the influence of the Roman Empire, but yes, the founding fathers definitely had a hard-on for the classics. It shows up partcularly in the American south. If you look at those big beautiful Civil War era plantation homes, you’ll see wide rotundas and columns. Even Monticello was modeled on Greco-Roman architecture. The influence shows up in names as well; it’s why there’s a number of Confederate soldiers named Virgil, Julius, and Augustus.

  10. Night-Gaunt says:

    Jimmy Carter as a god of peanuts and house building? Makes sense. I’d like to get a list of things in this alternate history showing its divergences sometime.

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